Shielded CAT 6A To non shielded patch panels
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Shielded CAT 6A To non shielded patch panelsExpand / Collapse
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Posted Monday, May 16, 2011 1:54 PM
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What are the risk invalved in running Shielded CAT 6A cable to a non shielded patch panel?

We are running our cables in large bundles and wanted to use shielded to help stop cross talk. 

What are the pros and cons of not having shielded termination points at each end?

James Pope

Post #6043
Posted Monday, May 16, 2011 3:16 PM


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James

1. every product / system / component, is designed by a enginnering team to realease to the market sytems that WORKS as they were designed and produced.

2. if you want:
* NOT to follow the instructions set, then you can not ask nor grant to the end user performance as manufacturer warrants.
* "save" money, is nonsense to do it using a system out of the manufactures spec´s, do you think that the customer will not discover the issue?
* RE enginnering the system, why do not call/write to the manufacturer proposing your ideas?
* a lawsuit, be the guest!

roberto sanchez,RCDD


roberto sanchez,RCDD
Perfil Activo y Creativo, S.A. de C.V.
México
Post #6044
Posted Monday, May 16, 2011 8:49 PM
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Thanks
I am the customer, I don't want the company line. my question was what are the pros and cons. If you don't know that ok.


James Pope
Post #6045
Posted Tuesday, May 17, 2011 5:28 AM


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James,

Roberto tried to give you some thoughts but I guess that they just went over your head. Also being that he is from a spanish speaking country his english may not be perfect but many of us here at this board respect his knowledge and experience. He is a regular contributor and brings forth great insite and expertise.

On to your issue

If you want shielding for your cable, then use the proper patch panel so the shield can be terminated and grounded thus activating the shield. At the station end, the shield could be just dead ended and taped off if that is what you desire without further issue.

Leaving the shield unterminated (ungrounded) will have an adverse effect on the cable's performance and possibly cause additional problems vs. use of unshielded cable. Not to mention potential shock from a built up charge due to cable capacitance.

This seems to be a penny wise, pound foolish situation and I for one cannot understand why you would want to do this in the first place.

If this is your contractor's idea then run as fast as you can and find a new one who actually cares about doing the proper installation for you, not just a band-aid solution to cover a large wound.

Joseph Golan, RCDD (Retired)

Palm Coast, FL

Post #6046
Posted Tuesday, May 17, 2011 10:41 AM
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There are no pros for this.

Cons:

1. As stated before the potential for shock.

2. You are more than likely creating a really large antenna array that will attract EMI instead of mitigating it.

3. You overall cost savings of a shielded patch panel vs. a standard 6A panel is minor, considering the cost of the cable

Hope this helps.

Christopher S. Hobbs, RCDD, RTPM | ICT Training Delivery Specialist | chobbs@bicsi.org
BICSI | Advancing the Information and Communications Technology Community | 8610 Hidden River Parkway | Tampa, FL 33637
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Post #6047
Posted Tuesday, May 17, 2011 2:05 PM


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I think my colleagues have misread your question. You are proposing UTP Panel to UTP Panel connected using a shielded cable? Yes, you can do this - sort of.

I am sure some cable vendors will not thank me for the following. You can take advantage of a "shielded type cable" with a UTP Patch Panel. There are two vendors offering such cable that I am aware of. There is General Cable with their MTP cable and Superior Essex cable with their 10Gain XP cable. Each vendor has a preferred connectivity partner(s) so be sure to pick one of them.

I have tested such a solution using Panduit connectivity and MTP cable from General Cable for Alien Crosstalk. Even links as short as 9 m passed the Category 6A Permanent Link PS ANEXT and PS AACR-F requirements. This is NOT an endorsement of this product. Just pointing out that I have data to support this scenario. It was a data center and the case study was documented http://myaccount.flukenetworks.com/fnet/en-us/StreamIt?Document=9824712 Look carefully and you will see my ugly mug.

Hope this helps.


Kind regards

Adrian Young
Senior Technical Support Engineer
Fluke Networks Technical Assistance Center

You can test short Cat 6A links, if you've installed the right connector. This video explains why.
Post #6048
Posted Tuesday, May 17, 2011 2:18 PM
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Mr. Golan, I think you over reacted to Mr. Pope's reply to Mr Sanchez's advice. Not everyone is gifted as you in this field and in the area of knowing people's intentions. You can come down now.
Post #6049
Posted Wednesday, May 18, 2011 10:49 AM
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Thanks EveryoneFirst off I may have been brash with Roberto, my apologies. My frustration comes from working with a local government (County Level) and wanting to get as close as I can to the standard with the limited funds that we have. I think that the largest cost is the cable, and it is the most difficult to replace. With that in mind, in future projects I can bring the rest up to standard. Now if that will hinder or degrade the packet flow then I need to find other routs or lines of actions. I want to look to the future for our network and not just see the present. Again great post and thanks for not just spouting the company line, there are always other options.

James Pope
Post #6050
Posted Monday, July 25, 2011 5:55 PM


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Shielded CAT6A.

Sure!  Understanding that you want the best cabling money can buy and performance at the fastest speeds.  Yes?  If installed correctly, you will not only have paid for the Royal Royce, but will be able to drive it with confidence.

Let's cut to the chase.

My shield won't help you now at present speeds, and neither will it help tomorrow at future speeds.  If you want to impede cross talk, then do it at the terminations!!

Captain Cable

Post #6207
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