Flash test for Splice closures
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Flash test for Splice closuresExpand / Collapse
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Posted Wednesday, August 10, 2016 10:35 AM
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Hi ,

Is it required to do flash test for Splice closures inside Cable vault

Yemcees
Post #10330
Posted Monday, August 29, 2016 12:04 PM
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If owner requires it,
I would not want to leave a splice case untested, imagine if water were to enter the case and migrate down the cable, and you were the last one in it. It should be good practice to flash test after completing your work...should be part of the craft.
If required, the owner would usually have witness to the flash test.


Richard
Post #10340
Posted Thursday, August 23, 2018 12:30 AM
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wuxiaworld
Post #10974
Posted Wednesday, September 05, 2018 2:28 AM
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Post #10983
Posted Tuesday, September 18, 2018 1:31 PM
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What exactly is a Flash Test? I was just reading the TIA-758-B standard this morning and didn't see a Flash Test.

TIA,

RichardB (8/29/2016)
If owner requires it,
I would not want to leave a splice case untested, imagine if water were to enter the case and migrate down the cable, and you were the last one in it. It should be good practice to flash test after completing your work...should be part of the craft.
If required, the owner would usually have witness to the flash test.


RCDD, TECH, INST1, INSTC, INSTF
Post #10997
Posted Saturday, November 17, 2018 1:26 PM
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A flash test is dependent on the type of splice enclosure. There are numerous different types of OSP enclosures on the market depending on cable type (copper/fiber), placement (aerial. direct buried, underground) and splice configurations (straight, butt, branch).

If it is required by the manufacturer: Follow the instruction/assembly/test directions!

Flash test if required: Filling the enclosure with a specified amount of air pressure up to a predetermined PSI (from the manufacturer) and checking for any air leaks. This can be accomplished by monitoring the air pressure with a gauge for a decrease in the PSI. Typically the enclosure is monitored for a predetermined period of time, up to the longest I've seen is ten minutes. This can also be preformed by "soaping" the seams of the enclosure with a soapy water mixture and observing any air bubbles produced. This is similar to checking a tire for a puncture or air leak. Once again dependent on type of enclosure and cable type. This will ensure that there is no moisture intrusion after the enclosure/splice is placed in the MH, Vault, HH or directly buried.


IMO if the splice case is to be "dry" ie. non-filled (encapsulated) I personally would flash test it. I have seen and worked in enclosures that were installed properly but not flashed and on a future dates had to re-enter the enclosure. I have found them filled with water or could tell that there had been water intrusion into the splice. In colder climates this could cause the enclosure to freeze and fail or possibly damage the copper/fiber contained within. Some enclosures have a valve provided, some do not. The installers should have the valve (common field name: f-valve) in their tool bag just for the purpose of flash testing if the enclosure has a port for it. If the manufacturer states in the assembly instructions to flash test, it needs to be done to ensure a accurate seal.

OSP technicians always find field expedient methods to get the job done. Those shortcuts taken sometimes lead to future failures of the enclosure that they may not be aware of. Unfortunately, lack of formal training and more OJT leads to these types of problems and enclosure failure. They (technicians) are building the enclosures how they have been taught, not realizing that corners are being "cut" for speed.

Just my two cents from experience.

Hope this helps to explain what flash testing is and how it can be beneficial in the initial build to prevent future maintenance, possible outages and splice repair or replacement.

If you have any other questions feel free to give me a ring or PM me!


Jeff Noble
RCDD,OSP,TECH,CT
813-434-6293
Post #11027
Posted Saturday, November 17, 2018 4:14 PM
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Thanks Jeff.

RCDD, TECH, INST1, INSTC, INSTF
Post #11028
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